Pixelitis Picks: TV shows that need their own games

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You’ve had that moment. That one glorious moment where you realize that this fictional universe unfolding on that cathode ray tube liquid crystal display would be awesome to play around in. Whether it’s Toddlers and TiarasBattlestar Galactica or heck, even old shows from ages ago like Rocko’s Modern Life – these shows just beg to be translated to bits we could mold and mash in a game console.

And naturally, we here at Pixelitis have exposed them to daylight. Our staffers took on beloved television series both modern and antiquated and put their own spin on it to create an ideal videogame experience. From point-and-click to action-adventure, there was no end to what some of these shows could possibly end up as.

Read into our choices. Dissect, analyze or just flat out enjoy. Because you know you thought about it too.

Quantum Leap  needs its own game.

Cult classic Quantum Leap has such a wondrous premise to it that you wonder why it never received some sort of game adaptation.

If time-traveling epic Back to the Future can get an enjoyable game after all these years, then I think it’s time that the other awesome time-travelling series gets its fill.

An episodic point-and-click adventure would be the most ideal genre for the game given its investigative nature, but a first-person view might work too thanks to the show’s tendency to surprise the viewer (and protagonist Sam Beckett) by revealing which person’s body he leapt into when he looks in the mirror.

The main goal in each episode would be just like the show – Sam would have to find out what time period he’s in, whose form he’s taken, and what event he has to change in order to successfully leap again. Al would show up as a hologram that could help him out and be the lovable womanizing sidekick that he is.

They could reenact some of the more fascinating moments from the show such as the time Sam leapt into a teenage version of himself, an American soldier during the Vietnam War, or even Lee Harvey Oswald. Other episodes could feature entirely new scenarios, and the developer could have a field day exploring any person in any period of history.

And there’s no doubt that they’d have to get Scott Bakula and Dean Stockwell to voice their respective characters. That would really be something..

- Patrick Kulikowski

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Supernatural  needs its own game.

The television series Supernatural follows the brothers Sam and Dean Winchester as they hunt down all sorts of supernatural monsters such as ghosts, demons and various others.

I imagine that a Supernatural game would play as a point-and-click adventure with RPG-like elements, similar to Telltale’s The Walking Dead. The game would also be distributed the same way, with a new episode released each month.

In each episode, players would choose to play as either Sam or Dean as they attempt to solve and survive various supernatural threats throughout various cities. Conversations can encompass chats with civilians for information gathering or even life or death situations, where making the wrong decision would net negative results, such as being suspected or chased by local law enforcement.

Since the series has two main characters, this means it would always be a two-player game. Gamers could either team up with a friend or with an NPC. This also opens up the game for character-specific traits.

Conversations while playing with a friend would be resolved with a dice roll, similar to Star Wars: The Old Republic. The player with the highest role is the one that gets to talk.

With plenty of compelling episodes, tough choices and intense fights, a Supernatural game would surely be a series that I would enjoy.

- Allain Richard

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Firefly  needs its own game.

This show needs no introduction. Nor could I write one that would be worthy of all its subtle majesty, its nuanced glory. Its ever enduring awesomeness. Let it never be said that I wasn’t a man of extended… vocabulary. Firefly is arguably one of the best things to ever happen to television. And by arguably I mean Firefly fans will say it most definitely is one of the best TV shows ever and other people are wrong.

Wonder which camp I belong to?

But aside from all of my geek doting and oohing and cooing, Firefly could actually be perfect for a game. Imagine with me, for just a moment, what game might result from the successful mating of Red Dead Redemption and the Mass Effect series. Organized, squad based third-person combat…on horses. In spaaaaaace.

You would have the opportunity to embark on missions that require combat or stealth or diplomacy, and each character carries different strengths and weaknesses. You organize a party to match the situation and set forth, each time hoping to gather money to feed the crew, repair and upgrade Serenity and grow ever closer to discovering the true nature of The Alliance.

Now keep all of that in your mind. Let it stew for a while. Now imagine that the game wasn’t distributed by Fox and therefore not royally mis-marketed. Imagine the game was actually written by Joss Whedon. Imagine that the whole original cast came back to lend their voices to the characters. Imagine it was developed by Bioware. It isn’t hard to do.

I can’t keep writing anymore. It’s too beautiful. You should get the point by now anyways. It’s only a matter of time before the fans rise up and demand it. Let it begin here. *sniff*

- Matt Brown

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Dexter  needs its own game.

I’m sure the majority of gamers have delighted at one point or another in the general manslaughter in videogames that would generally be frowned upon if committed in reality. After all, there are no repercussions, no jail time, and no bothersome judicial process.

But the one thing I’ve noticed about those games is that they all take place within a similar setting. A soldier pit against overwhelming odds, fighting off hordes of enemies with nothing but his trusty firearm at his side. As the player, you fire your gun off in every direction, trying to take down as many enemies as you can. It can be rather impersonal.

So what would a game look like if it made these deaths personal? I believe it would end up being something like a playable version of the TV show Dexter. It would take the mayhem out of murder and make it something calculating and deliberate.

The structure of the game would be a third person perspective like Assassin’s Creed. Each of Dexter’s murders would be in the form of a small narrative puzzle, where certain conditions must be met before, during, and after each incident. Careful preparations must be taken in order to ensure a successful murder while avoiding arousing any suspicion. Players must buy cling wrap and duct tape, and make sure that proper places for murder are properly staked out beforehand. In the final executions, players must follow Dexter’s rituals via dialogue cues and quick time events, further immersing the player in the tension.

With an inexhaustible supply of those who Dexter would punish, the options for DLC could keep going on and on. Scenarios from the show and original stories could make a Dexter videogame as long running as the TV series itself.

- Tom Farndon

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Breaking Bad  needs its own game.

Forget The Anarchist’s Cookbook. Forget Fight Club. Forget any sort of nihilist pop culture ideal… I’ve got this. Pop open a 3DS and have yourself a ball with the Cooking Ice videogame for Breaking Bad a la Cooking Mama.

Walter White dons his typical hazmat suit and watches you and Jesse make batch, after batch, after batch of meth — all timed of course. You blow away the fumes so you don’t die from inhalation, and watch the simmering so the trailer doesn’t explode. If you’re successful, DING! Even better than Walter. And you get money, yo.

Every course would get harder and harder as you build upon the basic skills to make the perfect meth. Start with Pseudoephedrine. Then realize that you can’t get any more because your moron of a friend totally screws you over… Meanwhile, Walter concocts his own personalized recipes and you follow. Someone’s gotta diversify the creative capital.

Be careful though. Ending up with anything less than stellar would mean acid in a bathtub or getting beaten up by enemies.

Drug lords threatening to kill you? Whip up some fake ice and blow it up in their faces. Just make sure you don’t make Walt Mama mad or else you’ve got hell to pay. Or more people to murder.

And if Walt’s got you down, take a breather. Mini-games include making some breakfast with Walt Jr., giving you some downtime to sharpen your cooking skills and keep your mind open to new possibilities.

This game isn’t all cooking though, as all things must come to an end. Sometimes you just gotta kill a dude that’s in your way. In order to level up — there may be some gore and some violence.

But it’s all in the name of cooking.

Also, sequels. Cooking Ice 5: Brunchtime with Baddies.

- Karen Rivera

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Author: Pixelitis Staff View all posts by

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